The Book

 

 

 

 

This blog comments on Canadian (and occasionally comparative) national security law to update my National Security Law textbook and now also my 2015 book, False Security: The Radicalization of Anti-terrorism, co-authored with Kent Roach.

Please also see www.antiterrorlaw.ca for Bill C-51-related analyses by Craig Forcese and Kent Roach.

For narrated lectures on various topics in national security law, please visit my 2017 "national security nutshell" series, available through iTunes.

Please also visit my archive of "secret law" in the security area.

By Craig Forcese

Full Professor
Faculty of Law

Email: cforcese[at]uottawa.ca

Twitter: @cforcese

 

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Saturday
Nov122016

Enhancing the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians

My part of a brief to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, this paper endorses the proposed Canadian National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, but does so with an important caveat. In this last respect, it focuses on constraints imposed by bill C-22 on access by the committee to certain sorts of classified information. It raises concerns that these constraints may limit the effectiveness of the committee. Also contained in this document is annex comparing the proposed bill C-22 committee with analogues in the UK, Australia and New Zealand. The table in the annex includes details on: general features (such as membership and appointment); mandate and jurisdiction; reporting; access to information; and interface with expert review bodies.