About this Project

This blog comments on Canadian (and occasionally comparative) national security law to update my National Security Law textbook and now also my 2015 book, False Security: The Radicalization of Anti-terrorism, co-authored with Kent Roach.

Please also see www.antiterrorlaw.ca for Bill C-51-related analyses by Craig Forcese and Kent Roach.

For narrated lectures on various topics in national security law, please visit my 2017 "national security nutshell" series, available through iTunes.

 

For a continuing conversation on Canadian national security law and policy, please join Stephanie Carvin and me at A Podcast Called INTREPID.

 

Please also visit my archive of "secret law" in the security area.

By Craig Forcese

Full Professor
Faculty of Law

Email: cforcese[at]uottawa.ca

Twitter: @cforcese

 

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Monday
Sep112017

Government Proposals for Reforming National Security Criminal and Civil Trials

In August, the government circulated a targetted consultation document propoing a series of changes to the way in which national security secrets are kept in criminal and civil proceedings. This is very inside-baseball stuff, but essentially the government is responding to long-standing concerns about "intelligence-to-evidence", the thorniest matter in Canadian national security law.

The criminal law changes would reform the Canada Evidence Act, s.38 process to, among other things, open the door to provincial superior court trial judges, allowing them to participate more fully in it. (Section 38 allows the government to block disclosure of national security secrets in legal proceedings. This preserves sensitive information from exposure, but there is a trade-off: the government cannot then use these same secrets in the legal proceeding to defend or prosecute a case.) The civil law proposals echo these Canada Evidence Act changes, but then also propose "closed material proceedings" (CMP). The latter is a novel proposal. Basically, CMP would allow secret trials in civil cases: the government could use secrets in closed proceedings on the merits of the case, in a closed hearing from which the public and the other litigants are excluded.

Kent Roach and I have prepared a brief response to these proposals, generally supporting the criminal law reforms, but also urging that the need for reform here is as much operational as legal. We also express doubts about the closed material proceedings proposal.  Our paper is posted here. The abstract for that paper is as follows:

This paper responds to the government’s proposals for redressing the “intelligence-to-evidence” (I2E) dilemma in national security judicial proceedings, discussed in its targeted consultation document distributed in August 2017. The paper urges the need for not just law reform, but also operational reform in terms of how police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) manage their "parallel" national security investigations. We renew our doubts about the parallel investigation and the dangers it poses for national security. The paper supports the government's proposed changes to the Canada Evidence Act, s.38 national security confidentiality procedures for criminal trials. In particular, it agrees that trial court judges should be able to make and modify s.38 non-disclosure orders. It urges, however, that Parliament codify the Stinchcombe disclosure rules, and their application to national security proceedings, and not simply double-down by codifying the O'Connor "third party" rule -- something that may reinforce parallel police/CSIS investigations. The paper expresses considerable skepticism for the "closed material proceeding" (CMP) proposal in civil trials implicating national security proceedings. These would produce, in essence, secret civil trials. We suspect secret civil trials would be challenged on division of power grounds, under s.96 of the Constitution Act 1867 and even under the Charter and the open court principle and, if it remains applicable, the Canadian Bill of Rights. More immediately, the CMP proposal seems likely to make a bill responding to neglected criminal law I2E issues much more controversial than it needs to be.