About this Project

This blog comments on Canadian (and occasionally comparative) national security law to update my National Security Law textbook and now also my 2015 book, False Security: The Radicalization of Anti-terrorism, co-authored with Kent Roach.

Please also see www.antiterrorlaw.ca for Bill C-51-related analyses by Craig Forcese and Kent Roach.

For narrated lectures on various topics in national security law, please visit my 2017 "national security nutshell" series, available through iTunes.

 

For a continuing conversation on Canadian national security law and policy, please join Stephanie Carvin and me at A Podcast Called INTREPID.

 

Please also visit my archive of "secret law" in the security area.

By Craig Forcese

Full Professor
Faculty of Law

Email: cforcese[at]uottawa.ca

Twitter: @cforcese

 

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Most Recent Blog Postings
Tuesday
Dec052017

Bill C-59 Flowcharts: CSIS dataset approval processes

Again, for my own use, to make sure I understand how the system will work, I have prepared a "decision-tree" on the proposed CSIS acquisition and retention of "datasets" -- that is, electronic archives of information that is not itself strictly necessary for a threat investigation under s.12.

Again, caveat emptor, as I do not claim this is perfect!  But if of use to others, I share. (If it does not open when you click on the thumbnail, if may be downloaded here.)

Monday
Dec042017

Bill C-59 Flowcharts: CSE mandates approval processes

Ottawa is apparently full of flowcharts outlining the bill C-59 powers to various security services. In preparation for my own appearance at SECU, I had time to draw up a diagram on CSE's new powers. I prepared this for personal use late into a Sunday evening, so I cannot promise it is perfect. But if it is a helpful starting point for others, I post here. (If the chart does not appear in full resolution when you click below, click here).

Monday
Dec042017

My New Project: Commander Andrew Drew RN

 

As my forthcoming book, Destroying the Caroline: The Frontier Raid that Reshaped the Right to War, goes to layout and printing at Irwin Law Books, the events that led to the destruction of the Caroline 180 years ago are upon us!  I have created a new Twitter feed, Cdr_Drew_RN, in the person of the Royal Navy Commander who led the raid. Tonight, he starts live-tweeting the 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada. I am hoping this will be a mildly entertaining way of introducing interested followers to the Caroline and its impact on international law and relations. This summer, I will be expanding my "Commander Drew" project into an online database on self-defence and use of force in international law.

In the interim, here is the abstract to my new book:

In the middle of night on December 29, 1837, Canadian militia commanded by a Royal Navy officer crossed the Niagara River to the United States and sank the Caroline, a steamboat being used by insurgents tied to the 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada. That incident, and the diplomatic understanding that settled it, have become the short-hand in international law for the “inherent right to self-defence” exercised by states in far-off places and different sorts of war. The Caroline is remembered today when drones kill terrorists and state leaders contemplate responses to militarily-threatening adversaries. But it is remembered by chance and not design, and often imperfectly. This book tells the story of the Caroline affair and the colourful characters who populated it. Along the way, it highlights the various ways in which the Caroline and self-defence have been used – and misused – in response to modern challenges in international relations. It is the history of how a forgotten conflict on an unruly frontier has redefined the right to war.